Health and Safety Training Courses

Health and Safety Training Courses

 

Health and Safety Training Courses

Health and Safety Training Courses

 

Did you know that an average of 200 people die from work-related accidents and that hundreds more are injured in every country? Conceptualising these questions and getting the gist of the matter requires knowledge on health and safety training courses. It is without doubt that avoiding workplace accidents and ensuring the safety of your valuable workers must be part of the priorities of a good employer.

 

Benefits of health and safety training courses

 

For sure, nobody likes working in an environment prone to accidents; therefore, effective training ensures that employees and employers are competent to handle occupational safety and health issues. Attending on-job health and safety training courses boosts the organisations ability to mitigate against work related accidents. In addition, it minimises financial costs that could result from workplace accidents and enhances productivity because of reduced distress resulting from poor health.  This benefits organisations and ensures increased returns.

 

Who should take health and safety training courses?

 

There is an adage stating “there is no ideal situation in the world, such place would be utopia”, as indicated by Sir Thomas More, a Greek philosopher.  This reality brings to our attention the need to undertake any of the health and safety training courses. It goes without saying, therefore, that whether self- employed, unemployed, an employer, a manager, supervisor, or a low-cadre employee – you should attend at least one of the safety courses.

 

Factors to Consider before Deciding on health and safety training courses

 

Many health and safety training courses exist; it is prudent that you decide on one that will greatly benefit you depending on your lifestyle and occupation. Categories of these courses include:

 

  • Occupational safety courses
  • Leisure courses
  • Home safety courses
  • Play safety courses among others.

 

In each category of a safety course, other rules exist; therefore, consider the following;

 

  • The requirements of the land laws – you should give priority to courses that are mandated by law to be taken to qualify for the particular occupation.
  • Your basic knowledge in the safety area – ideally choose a course in a field where you have no idea of what to do in case of an emergency.
  • The risk assessment of your occupation – for instance, if you are a driver, choose a course that educates you on how to avoid road accidents. Basically, the course you decide on should be beneficial to you.

 

International Labour Organisation (ILO) set aside 28th April to celebrate the world day for safety and health at work. The theme changes on yearly basis. This initiative has highlighted the need to attend health and safety training courses as a requirement by many employers.

 

The benefits of these courses are already being reaped due to decreased deaths and incapacitations as a result of work place accidents. In the developing world, few health and safety training courses are offered because of their undiversified economy and limited personnel. This should not be an excuse for these countries’ citizens to continue working unsafely.

Guide on Legionella Health Safety UK

Businesses are concerned over the recent outbreak of legionella. According to legionella health safety UK guidelines, the public must get medical treatment as soon as they experience symptoms of the illness.

legionela

legionela

The legionella bacteria are responsible for the pneumonia-like illness collectively known as Legionellosis. Legionnaire’s disease is a fatal illness that can infect everyone. People have a higher risk of contracting the disease if they are 45 years of age or above, heavy drinkers, smokers, suffering from chronic kidney or respiratory disease, or have a weakened immune system.

 

The bacteria are found in natural water systems including lakes, rivers and reservoirs. They are also common in man-made water structures such as evaporative condensers, whirlpool spas, and cooling towers. The bacteria can proliferate if the conditions are favourable. According to the legionella health safety UK guide, most of the outbreaks are linked to legionella growing in man-made water systems.

 

People get legionnaire’s disease by inhaling air or water that has the bacteria. Its symptoms are same as the flu that includes fever, high temperature, chills, muscle pains, cough, and headache. In severe cases, people suffer from pneumonia and show some signs of mental confusion.

 

According to legionella health safety UK authorities, there are risks of the disease in the workplace as long as it has a water system that can be a source of bacteria growth. There are risks of legionella if the water system has water temperature from 20 to 45 °C, spreads droplets, stores water, and has a source of food for the bacteria.

 

Cooling tower and hot and cold water systems are also considered as common sources of the bacteria. Legionella health safety UK guidelines also list air washers, humidifiers, indoor decorative fountains and emergency showers as other sources of the bacteria.

 

Employers and building owners must do their best to control the risks of the bacteria growth. Legionella health safety UK authorities state that business owners are responsible for taking the necessary precautions to decrease the risks of exposure to the bacteria. They must identify the sources of risk, manage the risks, prevent risks from happening in the future, keep records, and carry out other duties regarding the safety of people in the workplace.

 

Employers must have a written risk assessment for the water systems in the workplace. It must have a description of the system that includes the most recent blueprint of the system. The workplace is safe from legionella outbreaks if the risk assessment concluded that there is no significant growth of the bacteria.

 

Testing for open water systems must be done every quarter but there are instances when sampling must be done more frequent. For closed water systems, testing is done only when it is necessary according to the risk assessment for legionella. Authorities will conduct the tests on the water samples to find out if there are signs of legionella growth.

 

Employers and building owners can appoint someone to monitor the presence of the bacteria as stated by the legionella health safety UK standards. Authorities said that anyone can be one as long as they have the skills to implement strategies and control measures.

For a Legionella Risk Assessment contact us at www.safe2use.com

HSE fee for intervention FFI concerns

HSE fee for intervention FFI concerns

HSE fee for intervention FFI concerns  In October last year the Health and Safety Executive introduced the Fee For Intervention (FFI) cost recovery scheme, as part of its new self-financing program. One year later and 5,766 invoices for material breaches issued to a range of different industries, the state of the “relationship” between HSE and businesses is not of the happiest ones. Many businesses have been complaining about the lack of actual advice being received from inspectors and the aim of the HSE is to just collect the fees… It is important for businesses to understand the procedures that an inspector would follow when doing their job and act in accordance. A recent research, carried by DAC Beachcroft, has found that around 50 percent of those surveyed had not heard of FFI before the actual inspection had been conducted.  An easy to understand reason may be that most business owners are concentrating on running their  businesses and trying to make Britain great again, there is no time of thinking about possible HSE inspections. Duty holders are now expected to perceive and embrace health and safety as an essential part of good management and of doing business in general. So in order to avoid unpleasant surprises of an inspector knocking on your door, drop a call to your safety consultant or if you do not have one, try to keep yourself up to date with safety issues, legislation and news. HSE fee for intervention FFI concerns   The FFI will be charged to organisations only if a material breach has been found and written advice issued in those cases. If a breach in health and safety procedures is the case, no fees should be charged and you would receive simply verbal advice.   Here are some bullet points with a general idea on how to manage an inspection situation. HSE fee for intervention FFI concerns  * Compliance. As usual compliance with health and safety law is a key. Companies should follow the rules, because if not the costs could be much higher compared to the few pennies you may save, while trying to avoid them. Keeping up-to-date with all your safety paperwork (risk and fire assessments, method statements, copies of the relevant training courses, health and safety policies etc) is essential and make sure it is relevant for your line of business. Conduct safety audits and deal with safety hazards as soon as possible. These are simple steps which would permit you always to be ready, even if the inspection is unannounced. * Managing visits. Try to keep them short, organize and maintain the control over what is happening at all times. This is easily done, even if you are facing an unplanned inspection. As long as staff are prepared (especially receptionists and security, giving an easy and welcoming access to the premises) and there is a manager, duty holder or safety consultant (or a responsible worker with acceptable knowledge of safety procedures) available on site to escort the inspectors, the visit should run smoothly and favorably for you.  Start the visit with a brief presentation, sit on a quiet place and discuss the actual scope of the visit. It is extremely important to keep taking notes of all relevant issues that are being discussed during the inspection. This recorded information will give you an option in the future to challenge a material breach conclusion and/or dispute possible invoices. Respond confidently to any queries that the inspector may raise, if not immediately after the site visit explaining the company’s safety procedures. End the inspection with a brief closing meeting to clarify things and agree on action points. This is the moment when you can agree on a remedial action for a problem and explain the context of the suspected material breach, in order to avoid a written notice to be warranted.  * Dealing with a written notice. The key at this stage is to deal with them as quickly as possible. If a written notice for a material breach has been issued, you could arrange another meeting (you are likely to be charged for the inspector’s time in this case too), where you would have the opportunity to explain why you disagree and see how the inspector would react if a query against the decision is raised. It may result in the inspector not pursuing with the written notice or it simply could serve you to build up a relationship for the future. If a clear material breach has taken place in your organisation directly pay the bill (the average amounts during the first six months of the scheme were around £464) and also agree on a solution action plan of the problem with the HSE. When paying the invoice though, bear in mind that if you are being prosecuted on safety issues in the future, this could be used by as an evidence of acceptance of the material breach by the prosecution. Also you should be aware that when tendering for work you may need to declare that you have been fined and accepted a material breach. HSE fee for intervention FFI concerns

HSE fee for intervention FFI concerns

In October last year the Health and Safety Executive introduced the Fee For Intervention (FFI) cost recovery scheme, as part of its new self-financing program. One year later and 5,766 invoices for material breaches issued to a range of different industries, the state of the “relationship” between HSE and businesses is not of the happiest ones.

Many businesses have been complaining about the lack of actual advice being received from inspectors and the aim of the HSE is to just collect the fees…

It is important for businesses to understand the procedures that an inspector would follow when doing their job and act in accordance. A recent research, carried by DAC Beachcroft, has found that around 50 percent of those surveyed had not heard of FFI before the actual inspection had been conducted.

An easy to understand reason may be that most business owners are concentrating on running their  businesses and trying to make Britain great again, there is no time of thinking about possible HSE inspections.

Duty holders are now expected to perceive and embrace health and safety as an essential part of good management and of doing business in general. So in order to avoid unpleasant surprises of an inspector knocking on your door, drop a call to your safety consultant or if you do not have one, try to keep yourself up to date with safety issues, legislation and news.

HSE fee for intervention FFI concerns
The FFI will be charged to organisations only if a material breach has been found and written advice issued in those cases. If a breach in health and safety procedures is the case, no fees should be charged and you would receive simply verbal advice.
Here are some bullet points with a general idea on how to manage an inspection situation.

HSE fee for intervention FFI concerns
* Compliance. As usual compliance with health and safety law is a key. Companies should follow the rules, because if not the costs could be much higher compared to the few pennies you may save, while trying to avoid them. Keeping up-to-date with all your safety paperwork (risk and fire assessments, method statements, copies of the relevant training courses, health and safety policies etc) is essential and make sure it is relevant for your line of business. Conduct safety audits and deal with safety hazards as soon as possible. These are simple steps which would permit you always to be ready, even if the inspection is unannounced.

* Managing visits. Try to keep them short, organize and maintain the control over what is happening at all times. This is easily done, even if you are facing an unplanned inspection. As long as staff are prepared (especially receptionists and security, giving an easy and welcoming access to the premises) and there is a manager, duty holder or safety consultant (or a responsible worker with acceptable knowledge of safety procedures) available on site to escort the inspectors, the visit should run smoothly and favorably for you.

Start the visit with a brief presentation, sit on a quiet place and discuss the actual scope of the visit. It is extremely important to keep taking notes of all relevant issues that are being discussed during the inspection. This recorded information will give you an option in the future to challenge a material breach conclusion and/or dispute possible invoices. Respond confidently to any queries that the inspector may raise, if not immediately after the site visit explaining the company’s safety procedures. End the inspection with a brief closing meeting to clarify things and agree on action points. This is the moment when you can agree on a remedial action for a problem and explain the context of the suspected material breach, in order to avoid a written notice to be warranted.
* Dealing with a written notice. The key at this stage is to deal with them as quickly as possible. If a written notice for a material breach has been issued, you could arrange another meeting (you are likely to be charged for the inspector’s time in this case too), where you would have the opportunity to explain why you disagree and see how the inspector would react if a query against the decision is raised. It may result in the inspector not pursuing with the written notice or it simply could serve you to build up a relationship for the future. If a clear material breach has taken place in your organisation directly pay the bill (the average amounts during the first six months of the scheme were around £464) and also agree on a solution action plan of the problem with the HSE. When paying the invoice though, bear in mind that if you are being prosecuted on safety issues in the future, this could be used by as an evidence of acceptance of the material breach by the prosecution. Also you should be aware that when tendering for work you may need to declare that you have been fined and accepted a material breach.

HSE fee for intervention FFI concerns

 

How to Conduct a Fire Risk Assessment

How to Conduct a Fire Risk Assessment

How to Conduct a Fire Risk Assessments

How to Conduct a Fire Risk Assessments

One of the main legal requirements to consider when opening a new business is the fire safety issue. If you happen to be an employer, business owner, occupier, or landlord you are responsible for the fire safety of your workers, public and anyone who could be affected. Usually the duty holder or business owner is also considered by the Fire Safety Order to be the “responsible person” for the fire safety of any non- domestic premises.


Complying with fire regulations and making your business premises safe is very important. It can reduce the cost of public and building liability insurances, and also by minimizing the risk of fire certainly makes everybody's life easier… Trying to avoid and reduce costs in regard of fire safety is not the correct way of doing things, mainly because most fires could be effectively prevented. For example, most fires start due to failures in the electric system of the building, so even if your business doesn’t involve the direct use of fire or flammable substances, fire precautions should be followed and obeyed by everybody, even in the so called “low risk environments” such as shops and offices. We are not just talking about workshops and higher risk places than office buildings.

How to Conduct a Fire Risk Assessment

Who can conduct a fire risk assessment?
Anyone who is the responsible person for fire safety of non- domestic premises and employs five or more people should keep a written record of all fire risk assessments. Fire risk assessments are usually expected to be conducted by the responsible person, depending on the difficulty and the business activity there are many duty holders who successfully manage to do it themselves. The approach should be exactly the same as doing a risk assessment for any other kind of job; however some additional reading and knowledge of fire safety regulations might be required. Very often duty holders delegate that job to a professional safety expert (ideally professional fire safety expert), naming him or her as their “competent person”. Usually the local fire and rescue authority should be able to provide advice about if the risk assessment has been done appropriately, but it is illegal for them to carry out the assessment for you.

How to Conduct a Fire Risk Assessment

1. Identifying the hazards.
There are three things needed for a fire to start and should be considered as hazards- a source of ignition (heaters, lighting, naked flames, electrical equipment, cigarettes, matches, anything else that can get very hot and cause sparks), a source of fuel (wood, paper, plastic, rubber, foam, packaging materials, furniture, rubbish) and oxygen.
2. People whom would be at risk consider especially disabled workers and/ or members of the public.
3. Evaluate, remove or minimize the risks. As in every risk assessment identifying the level of danger and possibility of the hazard to occur is essential.

When conducting a fire risk assessment you should think about the probabilities and what type of fire the risk could lead to and try to remove or change it accordingly: level 1 fire hazard, level 2 small contained fire, level 3 significant fire, level 4 major fire, level 5 major fire with risks of fatalities. Anything significant should be unacceptable and it doesn’t matter how important an item, machine or work process is for your business, if there is a chance of it causing a fire of level 3, 4 or 5 it should be removed or changed.
4. Having appropriate fire exits and fire extinguishers and provide some training for the employees or occupiers on what to do and how to use them in case of emergency. Keeping fire exits clearly marked and unobstructed at all times, conducting regular drills. Depending on your business activity you should provide the correct fire extinguishers.
5. A good standard of general cleanliness and tidiness, especially when disposing off rubbish or storing potentially flammable substances.
6. Keep copies and make regular reviews of all your fire risk assessments. Reviews are very important when changing work procedures and really useful when conducting a safety induction for new staff members.

How to Conduct a Fire Risk Assessment

If you would like more advice please call us on 0845 519 9059 or visit www.safe2use.com

Are we going to see improved understanding of health and safety requirements for businesses?

Are we going to see improved understanding of health and safety requirements for businesses?

Are we going to see improved understanding of health and safety requirements for businesses?

Are we going to see improved understanding of health and safety requirements for businesses?

Let’s hope so… Regulatory bodies and local authorities’ performance will soon be measured and regulated by an improved Regulator’s Code. Planned to be published next spring (subject to Parliamentary approval), it’s expected to improve the way in which health and safety control is delivered by the awarded bodies.
Part of the many changes, direct results from the Lofsted review, which the Government has promoted during the last year, it is expected that this amended regulation will give a clearer idea of what the regulating authorities are expected and permitted to do. The aim is to raise the standards of service and control which hopes to improve businesses’ perception of health and safety authorities.
It is coming in to substitute the Regulators’ Compliance Code, and it’s claimed to be clearer, shorter and easier to follow and understand. Essentially, it contains simplified guidance, tools, case studies and templates which would give regulators more flexibility when attending businesses and setting up their own individual standards and requirements.

By creating this more flexible and risk- assessment based framework it’s expected to set up the rules so health and safety authorities can design their own particular approach on how to deal with businesses.

After consultation in which national regulators, local authorities, businesses and trade bodies have taken part, many issues have arisen regarding the complexity of the existing code. One of the main problems that the new framework is addressing is the fact that on many occasions standards and policies are published but are not well enough understood and sometimes, poorly delivered by the health and safety professionals and consequently poorly understood and implemented by businesses.

This inevitably leads to health and safety failures and incidents…

Are we going to see improved understanding of health and safety requirements for businesses?

The main solution for the confusion that businesses have complained about would be an open dialogue policy. Certainly, this is an issue that many health and safety consultants and advisers encounter on a daily basis.

Many duty holders and line managers have been found to be reluctant to invest in health and safety, complying just with the bare minimums. This is not always enough to keep workers safe. The introduction of the requirement of regulators publishing clear guidance and service standards would permit businesses to have an easy access to information about what is expected from them in case of inspection. Also, the new Regulator’s Code is promoting the attitude for regulators to actively engage in accepting complaints and suggestions from businesses, regarding safety issues.

Businesses, citizens and Government are expected to monitor regulators and challenge the authorities, if they are not acting in line with their own published rules.
High levels of compliance are considered to be the core mile stone of better safety culture and safer workplaces. For many safety professionals, health and safety is a vocation and highly satisfactory job which saves lives. Hopefully with the series of new regulations and the scraping of old and unnecessary ones which were developed and introduced during the last couple of years, we all are going to work in a safer and better country.

Clearer information and more understanding is what businesses have been asking for for a long time now, lets hope it is going to work out

Are we going to see improved understanding of health and safety requirements for businesses?

Slips, Trips and Accidents in the Workplace

Slips, Trips and Accidents in the Workplace

Slips, Trips and Accidents in the Workplace

Slips, Trips and Accidents in the Workplace

Whether someone slips, trips or falls over in the workplace, there is a set procedure that must take place. Slipping or tripping over something in the workplace is the most common accident caused at work. It is estimated that slips, trips and falls are responsible for causing 50% of all workplace injuries and accidents. Falling, particularly if from a great height can be the cause of more serious injuries and can often prove fatal. Therefore, the importance of risk assessment when monitoring ways to prevent slips, trips and falls cannot be understated.

 

So what does the Health and Safety Executive say about this type of accident or injury? In 1974, an Act was passed in law which requires employers the responsibility of ensuring all employees are safe. The Health and Safety at Work Act (1974) means employers must carry out regular assessments to look out for risks that may be deemed dangerous and cause employees to trip, slip or fall.

Slips, Trips and Accidents in the Workplace

A risk assessor would often be delegated by a company owner or building representative to oversee the daily duties of making sure the health and safety of those that work within the building are maintained. The health and safety officer would check for things like cables or wires that are protruding into walkways, platforms with insecure foot plates, liquids that have been spilled on the floor and carpet tiles that may have curled up on one corner and present a trip hazard to employers walking around.

 

The health and safety officer is then responsible for recording all the finding they have found and then taking action to remedy the situation, so that it no longer becomes a hazard which may cause an employer to slip, trip or fall.

 

The duties of the health and safety officer were enshrined in law in 1999 when a regulation was passed (The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999) requiring a health and safety officer to check regularly for risks that may cause an employee to trip, fall or slip anywhere in the workplace.

Slips, Trips and Accidents in the Workplace

Another regulation was introduced in 1992 requiring health and safety representatives to make sure all floors, pathways, warehouse floor areas, walkways and dining areas do not have any obstacles or hazards which may cause an accident (The Workplace ((Health, Safety and Welfare)) Regulations 1992). It determined that all employees and visitors should be able to move around the workplace safely and securely.

Slips, Trips and Accidents in the Workplace