health and safety rules relaxed

health and safety rules relaxed

health and safety rules relaxed

health and safety rules relaxed

Luckily for everybody, we are all beginning to see some direct results from the 2011 Lofsted Review and the health and safety rules relaxed… So far few of the announced changes sound quite promising. The negative attitude which this Government have had for the so called “Red tape” in Health and Safety Law is proving to simplify and clarify the rules, aiming to improve companies’ performance and let them concentrate in “ creating jobs”, according to recent statement of Vince Cable.

Currently few consultations are taking place until the end of October, pretending to get the opinion of the public and the professionals about the particular changes proposed. One of the consultations is regarding self- employed workers, whose business activity doesn’t represent a potential risk to others to be exempt of health and safety regulations.

The second consultation of the HSE is focusing on procedures. There is a proposal to remove or replace the 15 Approved Codes of Practice, which are the rules, applicable to most workplaces that regulate specific subjects ranging from ventilation and lightening to escalators and traffic routes. Up for re- examination is RIDDOR 1995(Reporting of Injuries, Disease and Dangerous Occurrences) procedure, as well. Following the recent April’ changes when the incapacitation period was increased to seven days as well as the reporting time put up to fifteen days. The consultations are open until 28th of October and the expected result is that the regulations would be changed in a way, more comfortable, clear and quick so it is easier for businesses to comply with health and safety requirements.

health and safety rules relaxed

The Government has announced also that is intending to help health and safety rules relaxed and regulations for all low risk businesses. The ones who will most  benefit from the changes will be shops, offices, pubs and clubs, the reduction consisting in exempting those businesses from proactive routine inspections from the Health and Safety Executive’ inspectors.

On the other hand, the regulator body would be concentrating its attention and efforts on all high risk industries such as nuclear, food, manufacturing and construction, while also paying a visit to those low risk industries which have a history of accidents. As part of the enforcement of the rules for all high risk businesses, the HSE has confirmed its Fee for Intervention Scheme (FFI). It is still pending Parliamentary approval, and it is part of the effort of the regulator’ body to try to recover some of the money spend on investigations and legal actions against organizations breaking health and safety rules.

Certain changes are expected to happen in the employment legislation and in its quest to eradicate the suing culture, the Government also announced some changes in the public liability regulations. From next month, businesses will only be held liable for civil damages in health and safety cases, if they can be proved to have acted negligently.

So great news, this measure clearly put common sense back on track, as current legislation stipulates that businesses automatically are liable even if they haven’t acted in a negligent way.

health and safety rules relaxed

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